In the marketing arena you will hear many times marketers talking about
the title of your articles and content. While we all know the content of
that article (including pictures) makes a huge difference in search
engines rankings and retained readership; we must not forget about the
title which is designed to attract the reader.

High quality content and pictures that are related can be worth 1,000′s
of visitors but how much is that title actually worth ? If the
following story about Forbes stealing a New York Times article is any
indication, the title is worth 100,000′s of visitors.

Just this past Friday New York Times published a new article entitled : How Companies Learn Your Secrets.
This lengthy article discussed in detail how large companies such as
Wal-Mart and Target collect data on individual consumer patterns to
figure out how to most efficiently keep their customers happy. This was a
great article but did it have the actual title that it deserved to have
?

When Kashmir Hill, a writer at Forbes, read this article and realized
the potential he created a more compact article with a more powerful
headline (title). Kashmir Hill got rid of most of the fluff and got
right to the meat of the story and written his article entitled : How Target Figured Out A Teen Girl Was Pregnant Before Her Father Did.

When I checked the story on the New York Times website, it had 60+ links
and shares on Facebook which was far less than the 17,000+ that Forbes
article has. The Forbes article currently has a mind staggering
1,063,916 views on it’s article.

The truth is that in the age of technology and popularity of newsfeeds
and streams, article/stories titles matter more now than they ever have
before. The highest quality content online can fail to drive traffic
without the proper title. The story of Forbes stealing a New York Times
article illustrates this very clearly with their recent Target article.

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